Scammer, Spammer or Scammed? Do you wanna bet?

Is ignoring spam sent in your name, the same as sending it?

Perhaps it’s “endorsement by apathy…” or a cooler term “Techno-apathy”.

This is an interesting story about some spam that was sent to one of our writers recently. So we took a look at the evidence and doing some investigation of our own uncovered the following story. We’ll let you draw your own conclusion at the end.

Prior to joining wumber, our customer had received a spam email which appeared to be promoting Sportsbet an Australian online sports betting organization. The subject read “This coming round of NRL & AFL Sportsbet are giving away $250 in free bets to all new members.” NRL and AFL are Australian football codes.

Upon further investigation the email contained only 2 unique URLs. The unsubscribe link (URL) which was a domain known as fairdinkum.net.au and the other link (which was presented twice) within the body of the email which surprisingly launched the sportsbet.com.au website, albeit indirectly and only after recording the click by the email user.

So let’s take a closer look at these facts. The  fairdinkum.net.au domain whois lookup returned Matthew D Long as the registrant using an Australian Business Registration Number 68 787 383 278, which is registered to an Australian business (Sole Trader) called MATTHEW DAVID LONG in the Australian state of Victoria, so it’s reasonable to assume (without any appreciation that crooks and spammers may not be the smartest people on the planet) that Matthew D Long has an open email relay and is an innocent party in all of this, not withstanding the fact that the (non-working) unsubscribe link on the email was in fact fairdinkum.net.au. The sender was Sportsbet (noreply@fairdinkum.net.au)

The sportsbet.com.au domain returned whois details of SPORTSBET PTY LTD (ACN 088 326 612) the registrant is Nick Tyshing (nick@sportsbet.com.au)  while surprise, surprise, a whois lookup returned exactly the same registrant and details for sportsbetaffiliates.com.au.

You may be forgiven for thinking this is a case of MATTHEW D LONG acting as an affiliate through some sort of SPORTSBET affiliate program but that doesn’t mean that these emails aren’t spam and to further fuel the fire Sportsbet when confronted with these facts replied in an email:

Thank you for your email.
The emails sent to you are not from us. Unfortunately a website posing as us has been sending emails out and this of course is not acceptable. We are not affiliated with “fairdinkum”.
Our Marketing team are currently looking into the origin of the emails and we can assure you that the matter will be resolved.
If you require further assistance with the above, please do not hesitate to contact our Customer Service Team. We are here to help via Live Chat, Email, or Phone.
Kind regards,
Laura
Sportsbet Customer Service Team

So Sportsbet has dismissed their association with this spammer as an affiliate through any affiliate program that they may be using to promote their online gambling site.

A quote from the Australian Anti-Spam legislation reads “The Spam Act 2003 prohibits the sending of unsolicited commercial electronic messages—known as spam—with an Australian link. A message has an Australian link if it originates or was commissioned in Australia, or originates overseas but was sent to an address accessed in Australia.”

And our recipient has sworn that this email was unsolicited and the recipient was in no way related by way of purchase or prior relationship to either of these parties. We have confirmed that a clause known as “Inferred Right” doesn’t apply to the recipient either. The recipient went on to say that this was the second unsolicited email that had been received.

The email was clearly unsolicited and therefore a breach of the Australian Spam Act, the recipient was unable to unsubscribe from the spam, a further breach of the Australian Spam Act. So make of this what you will, but ask yourself about the legitimacy of a company that directly or indirectly employees spam tactics in which it is clearly the beneficiary of the links within the spam and then denies any participation. There are an unlimited number of businesses that would dearly love to be in this position.

Do you really want to give this company your money? If you win, will you really get paid? If they are your only choice to place a bet online use a wumber and protect yourself from the spam that I can assure you will follow the moment you do have a commercial relationship with this company.

It is important to note that in the months since Sportsbet.com.au was notified, although they had nothing to do with it, the spam has stopped? Coincidence?

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4 Responses to “Scammer, Spammer or Scammed? Do you wanna bet?”

  1. Nicole Heath Says:

    This is unbelievable! Paramount to selling drugs or porn on the net. What a crap company!

  2. Sasha Broad-Kolff Says:

    Nailed It!

    • Glenn Campbell Says:

      Imagine touting for business the same way in the funeral industry. “Bring Out Ya Dead!” “Bring Out Ya Dead!”

  3. worklesslivemoretoday Says:

    spam just sucks.

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